About

Ronni Jolles, an artist known for innovation, has introduced a new art form.   Paper – in its many colors and textures – is the essence of Jolles’s work.  The technique could be called collage or mixed media, but in fact, it is something quite different .  In a language distinct from painting, Jolles uses paper as a painter creates with paint.  The many different papers have been gathered from all over the world including such places as Nepal, Japan, Egypt, Thailand, Italy, Mexico, India, and Tibet.

Born in Rochester, New York, Jolles graduated from Cornell University and has received artistic training from the Corcoran School of Art, The Almalfi Music & Arts Program, the Art League School, and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

When discovering this new art form, Jolles had no idea that the medium of paper would, or could, lead to such a revolutionary art form.  Through experimentation and finely honed technical skills, Jolles has broken from convention with the creation of the both sculptural and highly textured artwork.

Jolles finds inspiration in the cyclical journey of trees, a clothesline hanging outside of a window, a children’s dance class, or a serene reflection in the water.  Individually, each work is a unique masterpiece.  As an exhibit, both awe inspiring and revolutionary.

Artist Statement

Paper – in its multitude of colors and textures – is the essence of my work. I am often asked: “Who taught you to do this?” The answer is no-one taught me this new art form. I created it myself.

My artistic life began with drawing, painting, printmaking, and photography. With a background in all of these media, I moved towards collage due to my tactile nature and my quest for texture. When I discovered paper as my medium, a whole new textural world opened up.

While working on a piece, it is the medium of paper that causes my work to constantly evolve and continually surprise me. I produce an ever-changing body of work that has a painterly quality but contains textures that can’t be achieved through paint.

I want viewers to look at each piece and wonder how I created it. In an art world moving towards giclee prints, each of my pieces is clearly an original and impossible to capture in two dimensions.